Exhibit

jhnmyr:

The making of the Born and Raised artwork, and an insight into the incredible work of David Smith. 

Makes my jaw drop. The end result is just incredible.

Good design is unobtrusive
Products fulfilling a purpose are like tools. They are neither decorative objects nor works of art. Their design should therefore be both neutral and restrained, to leave room for the user’s self-expression.
Good design is as little design as possible
Less, but better – because it concentrates on the essential aspects, and the products are not burdened with non-essentials.
Back to purity, back to simplicity.

-Dieter Rams

Good design is unobtrusive

Products fulfilling a purpose are like tools. They are neither decorative objects nor works of art. Their design should therefore be both neutral and restrained, to leave room for the user’s self-expression.

Good design is as little design as possible

Less, but better – because it concentrates on the essential aspects, and the products are not burdened with non-essentials.

Back to purity, back to simplicity.


-Dieter Rams

An interest in the outside and not the inside. For a man who famously said “”Graphic design…is not good design if it does not communicate,” Rand seems to have paid less attention then you’d expect on the actual content of the things he worked on. If you’ve ever seen the inside of a Rand-designed annual report for IBM or Cummins, you’ll see what I mean. Behind the beautiful cover one finds completely uninflected three-column typography (always, to be sure, in an elegant typeface) with photos on a grid that look like they were pulled out of a drawer. There is none of the compelling visual storytelling one associates with less acclaimed designers like Erik Nitsche or Lester Beall. The IBM annuals designed by VSA Partners in the last few years for CEO Lou Gerstner feature the kind of overactive, pluralistic “messy” layouts that I’m guessing Rand would find really irritating; they are also much better feats of communication.

-Michael Bierut


I’ve always found it so interesting that while examining Paul Rand’s beautiful work, I can never seem to understand his design decisions. I look at the more prominent designers today like Pentagram and Dowling Duncan, and I can see a clear and obvious reason for their decision - but Paul Rand eludes me…

I hate this typeface so much, but I can't stop using it.

From where do ideas come?

Thin air?

Time machines?

Light bulbs?

Alas, I’ve yet to find little reason to believe that they come from somewhere but me.

Are ideas colorful?

Shiny?

Tough or gentle?

Or are they really like different people, each clothed in funny fashions.

Hoo-rah, I think I get I’ve got it found.

That ideas are not anything but what I think of now. 

Julien Vallee

 In the digital age, I feel that designers are getting further and further away from creating things with their own hands. For me, playing with materials of the medium is one of the greatest parts of designing. I find that it’s always a welcome change to working on the computer (where I hardly ever get the chance to personally bring my work into the physical space).

Julien Vallee is one of my favorite designers. The working of materials and physical textures are an indispensable part of his work, and I absolutely love that. Instead of using computer programs to design the shapes, he actually creates them with his hands and photographs those models to come up with an end product.

Just awesome.